• @bfg9k@lemmy.world
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    403 months ago

    It just seems ridiculous trying to sue a DNS Resolver for copyright, that’s like suing a phone book company because some criminals used a public phone book to look up a number and do crime using that number.

    • @WhatAmLemmy@lemmy.world
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      173 months ago

      Little things like logic, sanity, reality, ethics, and morality are completely irrelevant.

      The only thing that matters is what you can convince a judge or jury to believe.

      • @lolcatnip@reddthat.com
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        42 months ago

        Judges and juries have been known to care about little things like logic, sanity, reality, ethics, and morality. Not always, but more often than not. After all, those little things are the reason we have court systems in the first place.

    • @lolcatnip@reddthat.com
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      32 months ago

      More like suing them for listing the number of a well known criminal enterprise in the business listings. That sounds crazy until you remember successful criminal enterprises manage to avoid criminal prosecution, so legally speaking, they’re just businesses with a reputation for being shady, which I think is a pretty good analogy to sites like Pirate Bay. Just as you wouldn’t sue a phone company for ignoring rumors, you shouldn’t sue a DNS service either, because you’d be demanding they censor their service based on rumors, and nobody in their right mind wants that.

    • @cybersandwich@lemmy.world
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      3 months ago

      Yea it’s sad that it had to be appealed to begin with but at least this is the right outcome. I’d imagine it can get appealed further though.

      The Dresden court stressed that its decision is final, which means the case cannot go to a higher court.

      I’m not familiar with Euro law, but why can’t it go higher?